Wednesday, 22 October 2014

I stutter../ International Stuttering Awareness Day

It's not something I have discussed with many people face-to-face, but I now have a stutter. I hate the stammer that has entered my life uninvited, I hate the fact I no longer trust that my speech will be fluent, I hate that I get nervous that I will get stuck and the fact that that makes me not want to speak at times.

It has complicated life, and my life was frankly complicated enough already,

I first noticed problems with my speech quite a few months ago now. To start with the problem was very infrequent, and I was the only one who was at all aware of it. Even now, it's far more obvious to me than whoever I'm talking to, but it's now bad, at times, to the extent that it hampers communication. In my particular case, prolonged sounds appear in my speech- I will get to a word/sound and then be unable to get past the first letter/sound. I often try to re-start the word, the phrase or the sentence to try to get past where I am stuck, but it can be challenging; if those attempts fail, then often if I take a breath and try again it all flows (e.g. I often try to re-ssssss ss re-sss try to re-sss *breath* I often try to re-start the...). If I get stuck and then panic about being stuck, getting past the sound I'm stuck on can be very difficult. At times like these, I actually like people to step in and try to finish my word for me, because otherwise the situation seems increasingly horrific, and the rest of what I need to say is likely to be negatively affected if I get stressed about being stuck. Getting stuck once can quickly escalate to getting stuck repeatedly if I stress about it, particularly if I am tired (when my speech is worse anyway).

Struggling with speech can cause real problems. An example- when checking in at hospital or collecting a prescription, a standard question is to confirm the first line of your address. When you reply ffff fff ff, due to your inability to say 'Five', it's kind of tricky. This has happened to me a couple of times now and I tend to just laugh it off, I do get there in the end!

When talking to people who stutter, my general advice would be:
1) Maintain a normal amount of eye contact, don't look away or turn away when it's obvious someone is struggling (I realise this can be a natural reaction if it feels awkward). Eye contact shows that you're still listening and are still interested to hear what they have to say. The stutterer may look away if they feel awkward, but that doesn't mean you should.
2) Try to make the situation as relaxed as possible. They're likely to be far more comfortable about their stuttering, and may actually stutter less, if you don't make them feel under any pressure and keep the atmosphere chilled.
3) Unless you know that the person is definitely ok with it, don't try to finish off their sentences, as tempting as it may be. People with stutters often get frustrated that they don't feel heard because people are forever deciding what they're going to say for them. Give these people an opportunity to speak and be heard.
4) Don't assume someone is nervous simply because they are stuttering. I have speech difficulties when talking to my closest friends and family, in situations where I am completely relaxed and comfortable. The stutter is just as likely to be causing any anxiety as it to be caused by anxiety. People can be totally confident and relaxed and still stutter.
5) Try not to laugh or make fun of someone for the way they say things. Be aware that people can feel very differently towards their speech difficulties. Some people accept and embrace them and are completely comfortable stuttering openly. Others will try to hide it or will feel awfully self-conscious or will avoid speaking for fear of stuttering. Some may be ok with you making a joke about it, but many will not. Think before you speak- it could be a sensitive subject.. That said, if someone laughs about their inability to say something or makes a joke about it, it's ok to laugh!
6) Be patient! I understand it must be frustrating when someone is not managing to get across what they're wanting to say and you're busy and it's taking a long time, but please just take the extra time to listen. Sometimes it may be a bit harder to pick out what is being said, but please do make the extra effort. You may only come across one person in your day with whom communication is difficult, but that person will likely have a number of frustrating interactions struggling to communicate with a number of different people- please show that person that there are good people who are willing to wait and listen to them.

Speech dysfluencies vary massively in severity and affect people differently. My speech problems are relatively mild, yet I find it quite difficult to live with and accept. There are other people who get stuck on every syllable but are used to their speech being the way it is and are largely unbothered by it.

I hope my speech problems will resolve with time. I have been referred for a speech therapy opinion so I'm hopeful they will be able to help. If not, I hope I will learn to live with my stammer and it will bother me less over time. I hope I will reach a point where I don't fear situations in which I am put on the spot and have to speak for myself.

Communication is vital, and struggling with something as basic as speech has made me appreciate the importance of communication so much more. It is important to remind ourselves that what is being said is far more important than the way in which it is said!




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